Modern Storm


What?! A page for Modern UR Storm? Yup!

UR Gifts Storm has been around for a few years at this point and its inception happened during a perfect crossover. Gitaxian Probe had been banned in Modern and Kaladesh's release was only weeks away. I'll admit, initially, I wasn't sold on a creature-based storm deck that focused on Gifts Ungiven as I was still hurt and attached to Pyromancer Ascension. I'll be the first to say that I'm thrilled to be wrong.

How the deck works is that if you have a cost-reducing creature (Goblin Electromancer and/or Baral, Chief of Compliance) in play, Gifts Ungiven on the stack, and at least three mana floating you have a deterministic kill with Past in Flames. A typical Gifts Ungiven pile will look like: Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, Manamorphose, and Past in Flames. From here it doesn't matter what they give you, you can make enough mana to cast Past in Flames from your graveyard or from your hand with enough mana floating to cast all of your "ritual-effects"Β from your graveyard into another Gifts Ungiven. This time you'll search up Grapeshot, Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, and most likely another Past in Flames (depends on how the first Gifts Ungiven went). From here I'm sure you can figure out the rest.

For more information on how to play the deck, check out some of our sweet content & links below!

My favorite thing about the deck is the requirement of #stormtwentyΒ for Grapeshot πŸ˜€

Modern UR Storm


UPDATED 09/17/2018

Main Deck
4 Baral, Chief of Compliance //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01NAV0OMB/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01NAV0OMB&linkId=bbcf9979a766180850cd81b2cf5de06b //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/BaralChiefofCompliance.jpg Baral, Chief of Compliance 2 Legendary Creature β€” Human Wizard

Instant and sorcery spells you cast cost less to cast. Whenever a spell or ability you control counters a spell, you may draw a card. If you do, discard a card.

1/3

The best enabler creature printed for Modern storm. Coming at a time of desperation for storm, Baral brought hope after the Gitaxian Probe banning.

The reason Baral is often considered to be the best enabler is because of its synergies with Remand (currently in my sideboard), but there's also benefits like being able to block a Goblin Guide or fend off Thalia, Guardian of Thraben.

Its only real downside is that it's a Legendary creature, which means you cannot stack them like you can Goblin Electromancer.

4 Goblin Electromancer //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0098MSC4M/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B0098MSC4M&linkId=280aadf1ad81fa9c10c45b49a18fb890 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/GoblinElectromancer.jpg Goblin Electromancer 2 Creature β€” Goblin Wizard

Instant and sorcery spells you cast cost less to cast.

2/2

The original creature enabler in Modern Storm! It's taken a back-burner with the printing of Baral, Chief of Compliance as it's not quite as good, but it's very close. The ability to play multiple copies sure helps!

Typical lists only play two, sometimes three, but my list has four! The reason why is I think for the first time in a long-time storm is best as a hyper-linear deck. You want to execute the plan of casting an enabler on turn two and then attempting to win on turn three. What helps makes this happen is the full-complement of creatures.

This change is due to modern being a very aggressive format not leaving you with a lot of time to "durdle" around with cards like Noxious Revival, other silly one-ofs, or casting cantrips for multiple turns searching for your next creature.

4 Desperate Ritual //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV6NZQ/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV6NZQ&linkId=dc8f0dbe84e710d7b2e7275e827641cb //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/DesperateRitual.jpg Desperate Ritual 2 Instant

Add .

Splice onto Arcane (As you cast an Arcane spell, you may reveal this card from your hand and pay its splice cost. If you do, add this card's effects to that spell.)

Very similar to Pyretic Ritual, but with the main difference of the ability Splice. With an enabler in play and two copies of Desperate Ritual in hand you can Splice for , as the enabler doesn't reduce Splice costs. One thing to keep in mind that comes up every once in awhile is when casting a Desperate Ritual from your graveyard, you can Splice on another copy of Desperate Ritual from your hand!

4 Pyretic Ritual //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV7W6A/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV7W6A&linkId=93f7bbd1379ada345b4ed932e77fcf23 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/PyreticRitual.jpg Pyretic Ritual 2 Instant

Add .

Pretty simple, modern doesn't offer a wide variety of playable "ritual effects." But with an enabler in play, Pyretic Ritual becomes Dark Ritual. Some advice for when counting mana, count multiple rituals with no enabler in play as "+1" and with an enabler as "+2" instead of taking the time to actually count the casting of the spells and then the additional mana it creates.

4 Manamorphose //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OVFDQG/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OVFDQG&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=KZKYFWEXCUVDSG5N //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Manamorphose.jpg Manamorphose 2 Instant
Add two mana in any combination of colors. Draw a card.

Not truly a "ritual effect" as it doesn't generate any mana without an enabler on the battlefield, but it does a few major things for the deck.

First and foremost, it color-fixes our "rituals" so that you're able to cast Gift Ungiven off of acceleration. After that, you can look at it like a cantrip in a lot of circumstances when digging for a specific need. Lastly, at it's very worst, it's free Storm for Grapeshot and Empty the Warrens.

Subtly one of the best cards in the deck.

4 Serum Visions //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV6F8Q/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV6F8Q&linkId=8ae2776975cd81c2eef1f3c960bfbe2f //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/SerumVisions.jpg Serum Visions 1 Sorcery

Draw a card. Scry 2.

Generally the best cantrip to play on turn one as Serum Visions "digs" the deepest into your deck (compared to the other cantrips it looks at three cards while the others only see two). That said, when mid-combo, I usually prefer the other two more as I don't want a random draw when I could have a choice. While not a great "Magic" card, I think Serum Visions is the best cantrip in the Modern storm deck in a vacuum.

4 Sleight of Hand //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV66YE/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV66YE&linkId=6630c82b5d1d2945dde625313474a2f9 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/SleightofHand.jpg Sleight of Hand 1 Sorcery

Look at the top two cards of your library. Put one of them into your hand and the other on the bottom of your library.

The second best cantrip in the deck, but the best one while mid-combo as you get to view both options unlike Opt and Serum Visions is a purely random card. I will cast Sleight of Hand on turn one if I do not have Serum Visions over Opt, while you do have the overall card quality comparison, it's better to hold up Opt on turn two as it looks like you're representing Remand.

4 Opt //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV56EK/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV56EK&linkId=cecba6124a337981963dcffe926c7fe1 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Opt.jpg Opt 1 Instant
Scry 1.Β Draw a card.

The weakest draw spell in the deck, it's greatest strength is its instant speed due to Remand (as well as permanent hate answers too! Abrade, Lightning Bolt, etc.). On the second turn being able to hold open interaction and if they don't do anything meaningful, advance your game-plan is certainly desirable. This is usually the first draw spell sided out.

If this is the case, you may be wondering, "well, why are you playing four then?" the answer is velocity. I want to execute a linear plan, having more cards that dig into what my hand needs will make this happen more smoothly. Extra cantrips also make keeping one land hands easier in a deck with seventeen lands.

4 Gifts Ungiven //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV6UWM/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV6UWM&linkId=be5a8c6f2de6ee1a8565d2f658b18804 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/GiftsUngiven.jpg Gifts Ungiven 4 Instant

Search your library for up to four cards with different names and reveal them. Target opponent chooses two of those cards. Put the chosen cards into your graveyard and the rest into your hand. Then shuffle your library.

The real reason this deck is playable! When you cast Gifts Ungiven with an enabler in play with three mana floating you have a deterministic kill. The first step is to find Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, Manamorphose, and then Past in Flames. From here it doesn't matter where the opponent puts the cards. If they give you any combination of cards, you have enough mana to cast Past in Flames from either your graveyard or your hand. Now, you recast all of your "ritual effects" and then Gifts Ungiven again. Now you find Grapeshot, Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, and then the last card is either Past in Flames or Manamorphose (this depends on where they put the first copy of Past in Flames). Now you can go through the same process, but ending with Grapeshot.

Now that you know how the card works with the deck and why it's great, let's talk about circumstances where Past in Flames isn't desirable. Typically it's against decks with a lot of graveyard hate, mainly Leyline of the Void. Against these decks I either side out all of my Gifts Ungiven or just leave two, replacing the main engine with Pieces of the Puzzle. The other common occurrence of Gifts Ungiven being a bit weak is when your opponent can't be the target of spells or abilities, typically from Leyline of Sanctity or Witchbane Orb.

3 Grapeshot //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OVIHZA/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OVIHZA&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=4QVEHJG74QOVG672 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Grapeshot.jpg Grapeshot 2 Sorcery

Grapeshot deals 1 damage to any target.

Storm (When you cast this spell, copy it for each spell cast before it this turn. You may choose new targets for the copies.)

My favorite Magic card! It kills all sorts of creatures, mainly the hatebears that the Humans deck plays but Grapeshot's primary purpose is our main win-condition!

There's a few cute tricks you can do with Grapeshot such as allowing all of the copies to resolve and then cast either Remand and/or Unsubstantiate on the original spell to return the card to your hand. From there you can recast the Grapeshot. This is effectively having another Grapeshot in your hand for an additional two mana. Having multiple copies of Grapeshot is one of your easiest ways of beating a large amount of graveyard hate!

2 Past in Flames //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ON1IW2/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005ON1IW2&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=JWXEQASWCWD5H6R6 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/PastinFlames.jpg Past in Flames 4 Sorcery

Each instant and sorcery card in your graveyard gains flashback until end of turn. The flashback cost is equal to its mana cost.

Flashback (You may cast this card from your graveyard for its flashback cost. Then exile it.)

The sole true "storm-engine" of the deck, what separates the very good Storm pilots vs. the average pilot is knowing when to going off with Past in Flames without an enabler as it's not an easy task. Games that are deterministic are easy, it's the games where you take the highest probability path without knowing if you'll get there are where play-skill and knowledge of the deck really come into play. Past in Flames is a card that requires a lot of practice, not every game will be an easy 3 mana floating game.

It's worth noting that the flashback cost is reduced by our enabler creatures for you new storm pilots out there, it's a question that pops up frequently.

1 Empty the Warrens //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OVIC1Y/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OVIC1Y&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=AJXI36BB3UF7ZY4L //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/EmptytheWarrens.jpg Empty the Warrens 4 Sorcery

Create two 1/1 red Goblin creature tokens.

Storm
(When you cast this spell, copy it for each spell cast before it this turn.)

Not a typical main deck card, but I think you gain a lot of value out of the unexpected. My belief is that by not playing the stock lists, cards like Meddling Mage will be less effective by not knowing to name effects like Empty the Warrens. Rather than something common like Unsubstantiate or Repeal.

Empty the Warrens is highly effective in a lot of non-combo match-ups, typically midrange and control decks. Against aggro decks, it's a good road-block to stop the bleeding while you build for an actual kill.

There's also a slight benefit of by moving one of my copies of Empty the Warrens to the main deck, I've opened up a sideboard slot.

1 Perilous Voyage //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075RJH77W/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B075RJH77W&linkId=071cae4640e1a1367b7fa17edf429a84 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/PerilousVoyage.jpg Perilous Voyage 2 Instant

Return target nonland permanent you don't control to its owner's hand. If its converted mana cost was 2 or less, scry 2.

Similar to my views on main deck Empty the Warrens, there's a lot to be said about being unconventional in a world with Meddling Mage paired with Phantasmal Image. Perilous Voyage is an atypical card in a world where most people can see a land drop and know the rest of your deck, so by playing something out of the norm, you gain a huge advantage when your opponent tries to lock you out of the game by cutting off your options with "chanting" creatures.

The reason I chose Perilous Voyage over other possible cards is its ability to scry two most of the time, most cards you care about are CMC 2 or less. If the permanent costs more than this, it's beneficial that you're paying less mana than Repeal anyway! I even don't mind casting it just to fix the quality of your draws while slowing the opponent down. Overall, I think Perilous Voyage is a solid card.

4 Scalding Tarn //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002R3NU7S/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B002R3NU7S&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=VYC7IHBTFZC4K3YT //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/ScaldingTarn.jpg Scalding Tarn None. 0 Land

Pay 1 life, Sacrifice Scalding Tarn: Search your library for an Island or Mountain card and put it onto the battlefield. Then shuffle your library.

"Why do you play fetchlands?" I hear this question a lot. Let me start off by saying, that the first reason is the same reason throughout Magic as everyone else, deck thinning and an increased percentages of drawing non-land cards in the late game. While these are small percentages they do add up over the course of a longer game, which is very relevant to a combo deck. The "fetchless" lists often have this issue with pockets of lands in long-lasting games. This may seem weird if you've heard the counter argument of actually playing the "fetchless" lists of, "better draws throughout the game due to no shuffling with your scrys" the real issue with this is that's not actually how Magic: the Gathering games go. As a Modern storm player you often cast Gifts Ungiven on an end-step and undo all of the scry-work that you've previously done. There's also the fact that your opponents often shuffle your deck using Path to Exile, Ghost Quarter, Field of Ruin, and Assassin's Trophy. My major concern with these "fetchless" lists is you don't want to get rid of the cards forever, you just don't need them at the moment. Another thing people glance over when looking at lists that play fetchlands relates back to deck thinning is less lands in your deck is a huge benefit for the card Pieces of the Puzzle. You want your deck to be flesh full of instants and sorcerys, not excess lands.

Let's imagine a scenario where you need a second land, you cast Sleight of Hand and see Gifts Ungiven and Shivan Reef. For the rest of the game, you're a combo deck playing down a critical piece of your engine. You want Gifts Ungiven, just not right then. This is part of the reason fetchlands make sense.

There's also the benefit of not being easily locked out of the game by Blood Moon, which is a real issue. Having access to basic lands when you need them is incredibly beneficial. I've heard the counter argument of "Fetchless plays five to six basics" while this is true, they can't always find them when they've locked out of the game on turn two. When playing fetchlands, you have eleven opportunities to "fetchless"'s four to five to have a basic land. If "fetchless" is playing five basic Islands, I imagine there's also games where they struggle to find red sources, which wouldn't be an issue if they played fetchlands.

The last thing I have to point out is that I've heard "fetchless" players claim they take less damage throughout the course of a game. They're playing four copies of Steam vents and four Shivan Reef, this is false. On average they will take more damage/loss of life than the one time cost of using a fetchland.

1 Flooded Strand //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N9HPE9S/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00N9HPE9S&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=MPGJ5IXIKR7Q2I36 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/FloodedStrand.jpg Flooded Strand None. 0 Land

Pay 1 life, Sacrifice Flooded Strand: Search your library for a Plains or Island card and put it onto the battlefield. Then shuffle your library.

"Why don't you play Snow-Covered Island?" When you're playing fetchlands, you don't need to play Snow-Covered lands as your deck naturally happens to have plenty of lands with varying names for Gifts Ungiven. The second you play a Snow-Covered Island, your opponent immediately knows that you're on Storm. There's no reason to give that information away, especially considering how little the name-difference is relevant.

It's certainly cool to search for two basic Islands with different names, but how often is it relevant? Not very. Instead with this list, if the occasion ever were to present itself, you can just search for the three off-brand fetchlands and that'll do the trick. You may notice that all of these lands search for basic Island and not basic Mountain, that's because having access to Island in the early stages of the game is a lot more critical for cantrip development of your game-plan.

1 Misty Rainforest //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002R3GXKO/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B002R3GXKO&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=HGGFZWB75ESI65GQ //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/MistyRainforest.jpg Misty Rainforest None. 0 Land

Pay 1 life, Sacrifice Misty Rainforst: Search your library for a Forest or Island card and put it onto the battlefield. Then shuffle your library.

"Why don't you play Snow-Covered Island?" When you're playing fetchlands, you don't need to play Snow-Covered lands as your deck naturally happens to have plenty of lands with varying names for Gifts Ungiven. The second you play a Snow-Covered Island, your opponent immediately knows that you're on Storm. There's no reason to give that information away, especially considering how little the name-difference is relevant.

It's certainly cool to search for two basic Islands with different names, but how often is it relevant? Not very. Instead with this list, if the occasion ever were to present itself, you can just search for the three off-brand fetchlands and that'll do the trick. You may notice that all of these lands search for basic Island and not basic Mountain, that's because having access to Island in the early stages of the game is a lot more critical for cantrip development of your game-plan.

1 Polluted Delta //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV7BWK/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005OV7BWK&linkId=2fea77055ffaaec9f5ac697c7fc74f2a //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/PollutedDelta.jpg Polluted Delta None. 0 Land

Pay 1 life, Sacrifice Polluted Delta: Search your library for an Island or Swamp card and put it onto the battlefield. Then shuffle your library.

"Why don't you play Snow-Covered Island?" When you're playing fetchlands, you don't need to play Snow-Covered lands as your deck naturally happens to have plenty of lands with varying names for Gifts Ungiven. The second you play a Snow-Covered Island, your opponent immediately knows that you're on Storm. There's no reason to give that information away, especially considering how little the name-difference is relevant.

It's certainly cool to search for two basic Islands with different names, but how often is it relevant? Not very. Instead with this list, if the occasion ever were to present itself, you can just search for the three off-brand fetchlands and that'll do the trick. You may notice that all of these lands search for basic Island and not basic Mountain, that's because having access to Island in the early stages of the game is a lot more critical for cantrip development of your game-plan.

4 Spirebluff Canal //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LLYMM0Y/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01LLYMM0Y&linkId=78e2909aed39ba099af9bb0bd6250c82 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/SpirebluffCanal.jpg Spirebluff Canal None. 0 Land

Spirebluff Canal enters the battlefield tapped unless you control two or fewer other lands.

Add or .

By far the best land in the deck. Zero damage and comes into play untapped 80% of the time. Typically it's the first land I play, but there are occasions with having cantrips and fetchlands, as well as Spirebluff Canal where I'll search for my basic on turn one and then cantrip. Turn two play Spirebluff, and then this leaves the possibility of playing a second copy on your third turn untapped while maximizing your scry.

2 Steam Vents //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0062DZO28/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B0062DZO28&linkId=80397b1eb38f1393a2c5771b2ade843f //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/SteamVents.jpg Steam Vents None. 0 Land

As Steam Vents enters the battlefield, you may pay 2 life. If you don't, Steam Vents enters the battlefield tapped.

Add or .

The best non-Spirebluff Canal dual land available that is searchable with your fetchlands and isn't recurring damage like Shivan Reef. There isn't much to be said about the shocklands other than plan ahead in match-ups where the damage is relevant and try to take less damage by searching for them on the end-step.

3 Island //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HZRFBFA/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00HZRFBFA&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=EPK4RZ6PTTNM7WYX //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Island.jpg Island None. 0 Land

Add .

Not being locked out of the game by Bloon Moon is always good, basic lands (more so the Island in this scenario) are good to have. Especially in a world with Field of Ruin, Path to Exile, Ghost Quarter, and now Assassin's Trophy. I'm considering a fifth basic land at the moment due to the increased presence of cards that provide you with them. Blue mana is more desirable in the set-up stages of the game which is why you see more copies of Island than Mountain, generally, you really only need red mana on the combo turn or when answering a threat.

1 Mountain //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV4Z4M/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OV4Z4M&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=BL2QTPI2UYUMUUB7 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Mountain.jpg Mountain None. 0 Land

Add .

In a world with Field of Ruin, Path to Exile, Ghost Quarter, and now Assassin's Trophy basics are a requirement. I'm considering a fifth basic land at the moment due to the increased presence of cards that provide you with them. Blue mana is more desirable in the set-up stages of the game which is why you see more copies of Island than Mountain, generally, you really only need red mana on the combo turn or when answering a threat.

Sideboard
4 Pieces of the Puzzle //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CUQL2XA/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01CUQL2XA&linkId=0fc933d326bf143c2763e1c64fa32234 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/PiecesofthePuzzle.jpg Pieces of the Puzzle 3 Sorcery

Reveal the top five cards of your library. Put up to two instant and/or sorcery cards from among them into your hand and the rest into your graveyard.

Boarded in for a few reasons. The first and most popular reason is a way to combat graveyard hate as Pieces of the Puzzle allows you to play around graveyard hate efficiently by just ignoring the issue. Chaining cantrips and Pieces of the Puzzle is a lot easier than it looks.

The second reason would be to dodge effects like Leyline of Sanctity shutting off your copies of Gifts Ungiven. The last reason would be simply to out-grind midrange and control decks by overwhelming them on cards, which is a very good strategy in these match-ups.

3 Remand //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0062DVD3C/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B0062DVD3C&linkId=6a07d6858e0b77f4740475cb8c1a5c75 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Remand.jpg Remand 2 Instant
Counter target spell. If that spell is countered this way, put it into its owner's hand instead of into that player's graveyard. Draw a card.

"Why aren't these Negates or Dispels?" I build by decks to be very dynamic and have cards that cross over in a lot of match-ups, I'm a huge proponent of flexibility and those cards are very narrow. I want to be able to side these in against KCI, Tron, Storm, RG Ponza, Control decks and a lot more.

There's also the synergies built into your own deck with Grapeshot and Empty the Warrens. The final reason would be that you're a combo deck, the extra draw is actually huge in being able to execute your own game plan.

If you want to play traditional counterspells in this slots, you do you, but I don't believe you're getting the most out of your available slots.

2 Empty the Warrens //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OVIC1Y/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OVIC1Y&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=AJXI36BB3UF7ZY4L //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/EmptytheWarrens.jpg Empty the Warrens 4 Sorcery

Create two 1/1 red Goblin creature tokens.

Storm
(When you cast this spell, copy it for each spell cast before it this turn.)

Another way to beat graveyard hate as well as to "out-grind" midrange and control decks. When I side out all of my enablers and bring in Empty the Warrens, I try to not over-extend if I don't have to. The plan isn't to go all-in but to slowly overwhelm the opponent over time. If each time I cast Empty the Warrens it dealt six-to-eight damage, I would be satisfied. But if they win the game, that's even better!

Storm players often forget about Izzet Staticaster and how it works regarding Empty the Warrens. Try not to allow yourself to be blown out by it, but you can also take preventative measures by holding open Abrade and/or Lightning Bolt. This way when they go to target your creature, you kill it in response, and then the rest of your Goblins live to fight another turn.

2 Abrade //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073G966S2/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tes019-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B073G966S2&linkId=ead3152a87a14d03f9e524a7559d4551 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/Abrade.jpg Abrade 2 Instant
Choose one β€”
β€’ Abrade deals 3 damage to target creature.
β€’ Destroy target artifact.

Probably the deck's best permanent based answer since the printing of Damping Sphere. It cleanly kills the majority of the ways your opponents are trying to combat you with hate-cards. I can't speak highly enough about Abrade, I wouldn't leave home without the second copy personally.

2 Lightning Bolt //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OV7RMO/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OV7RMO&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=6PBE2CZTZIIZCXD6 //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/LightningBolt.jpg Lightning Bolt 1 Instant

Lightning Bolt deals 3 damage to any target.

I used to be a lot higher on Lightning Bolt before the printing of Abrade and Damping Sphere. My issue is it doesn't fight back on all of the most popular axes that your opponents are trying to beat you with. At this point, I think it's really only in the deck for Burn and Humans. Within the last six months I've gone from four copies all the way down to two.

1 Echoing Truth //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0062DRH50/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0062DRH50&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=L4DC6WFIHOZKB55F //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/EchoingTruth.jpg Echoing Truth 2 Instant

Return target nonland permanent and all other permanents with the same name as that permanent to their owners' hands.

Another card, another name. I say this because of Meddling Mage and our own Gifts Ungiven, but Echoing Truth does provide some other functionality. It's the best card for answering multiple copies of Meddling Mage or Leyline of Sanctity, it's also the cheapest way (tied with Perilous Voyage) the deck has to answer Enchantments.

1 Wipe Away //www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005OVJDQW/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B005OVJDQW&linkCode=as2&tag=tes019-20&linkId=JN3NIVL6XQLUQZOI //www.theepicstorm.com/wp-content/themes/TES-2017/images/cards/WipeAway.jpg Wipe Away 3 Instant

Split second (As long as this spell is on the stack, players can't cast spells or activate abilities that aren't mana abilities.)

Return target permanent to its owner's hand.

Wipe Away is in our deck for a few reasons, the first is to be able to answer a Damping Sphere from control decks so that we don't need to worry about it being countered. From there, you can untap and attempt to kill your opponent! The other main reason is that it's actual mana cost is three instead of two. This provides an out to a Chalice of the Void on two, even if those decks aren't very popular.

Baral, Chief of Compliance
Card Name: Baral, Chief of Compliance
Mana Cost:
Converted Mana Cost: 2
Types: Legendary Creature β€” Human Wizard
Card Text:

Instant and sorcery spells you cast cost less to cast. Whenever a spell or ability you control counters a spell, you may draw a card. If you do, discard a card.

1/3

Β» Buy on Amazon
Card Notes

The best enabler creature printed for Modern storm. Coming at a time of desperation for storm, Baral brought hope after the Gitaxian Probe banning.

The reason Baral is often considered to be the best enabler is because of its synergies with Remand (currently in my sideboard), but there's also benefits like being able to block a Goblin Guide or fend off Thalia, Guardian of Thraben.

Its only real downside is that it's a Legendary creature, which means you cannot stack them like you can Goblin Electromancer.

Hand Generator

On the draw versus Elves:

Would you keep this opening hand? YesNo

Creatures

Baral, Chief of Compliance
Goblin Electromancer

Baral, Chief of Compliance β€” The best enabler creature printed for Modern Storm. Coming at a time of desperation for storm, Baral brought hope after the Gitaxian Probe banning. The reason Baral is often considered to be the best enabler is because of its synergies with Remand (currently in my sideboard), but there's also benefits like being able to block a Goblin Guide or fend off Thalia, Guardian of Thraben. Its only real downside is that it's a Legendary creature, which means you cannot stack them like you can Goblin Electromancer.

Goblin Electromancer β€” The original creature enabler in Modern Storm! It's taken a back-burner with the printing of Baral, Chief of Compliance as it's not quite as good, but it's very close. The ability to play multiple copies sure helps! Typical lists only play two, sometimes three, but my list has four! The reason why is I think for the first time in a long-time storm is best as a hyper-linear deck. You want to execute the plan of casting an enabler on turn two and then attempting to win on turn three. What helps makes this happen is the full-complement of creatures. This change is due to modern being a very aggressive format not leaving you with a lot of time to "durdle" around with cards like Noxious Revival, other silly one-ofs, or casting cantrips for multiple turns searching for your next creature.

Mana Acceleration

Pyretic Ritual
Desperate Ritual
Manamorphose

Pyretic Ritual β€” Pretty simple, modern doesn't offer a wide variety of playable "ritual effects." But with an enabler in play, Pyretic Ritual becomes Dark Ritual. Some advice for when counting mana, count multiple rituals with no enabler in play as "+1" and with an enabler as "+2" instead of taking the time to actually count the casting of the spells and then the additional mana it creates.

Desperate Ritual β€” Very similar to Pyretic Ritual, but with the main difference of the ability Splice. With an enabler in play and two copies of Desperate Ritual in hand you can Splice for , as the enabler doesn't reduce Splice costs. One thing to keep in mind that comes up every once in awhile is when casting a Desperate Ritual from your graveyard, you can Splice on another copy of Desperate Ritual from your hand!

Manamorphose β€” Not truly a "ritual effect" as it doesn't generate any mana without an enabler on the battlefield, but it does a few major things for the deck. First and foremost, it color-fixes our "rituals" so that you're able to cast Gift Ungiven off of acceleration. After that, you can look at it like a cantrip in a lot of circumstances when digging for a specific need. Lastly, at it's very worst, it's free Storm for Grapeshot and Empty the Warrens. Subtly one of the best cards in the deck.

Cantrips

Serum Visions
Sleight of Hand
Induced Amnesia

Serum Visions β€” Generally the best cantrip to play on turn one as Serum Visions "digs" the deepest into your deck (compared to the other cantrips it looks at three cards while the others only see two). That said, when mid-combo, I usually prefer the other two more as I don't want a random draw when I could have a choice. While not a great "Magic" card, I think Serum Visions is the best cantrip in the Modern storm deck in a vacuum.

Sleight of Hand β€” The second best cantrip in the deck, but the best one while mid-combo as you get to view both options unlike Opt and Serum Visions is a purely random card. I will cast Sleight of Hand on turn one if I do not have Serum Visions over Opt, while you do have the overall card quality comparison, it's better to hold up Opt on turn two as it looks like you're representing Remand.

Opt β€” The weakest draw spell in the deck, it's greatest strength is its instant speed due to Remand (as well as permanent hate answers too! Abrade, Lightning Bolt, etc.). On the second turn being able to hold open interaction and if they don't do anything meaningful, advance your game-plan is certainly desirable. This is usually the first draw spell sided out. If this is the case, you may be wondering, "well, why are you playing four then?" the answer is velocity. I want to execute a linear plan, having more cards that dig into what my hand needs will make this happen more smoothly. Extra cantrips also make keeping one land hands easier in a deck with seventeen lands.

Engine & Win Conditions

Gifts Ungiven
Past In Flames
Grapeshot

Gifts Ungiven β€” The real reason this deck is playable! When you cast Gifts Ungiven with an enabler in play with three mana floating you have a deterministic kill. The first step is to find Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, Manamorphose, and then Past in Flames. From here it doesn't matter where the opponent puts the cards. If they give you any combination of cards, you have enough mana to cast Past in Flames from either your graveyard or your hand. Now, you recast all of your "ritual effects" and then Gifts Ungiven again. Now you find Grapeshot, Pyretic Ritual, Desperate Ritual, and then the last card is either Past in Flames or Manamorphose (this depends on where they put the first copy of Past in Flames). Now you can go through the same process, but ending with Grapeshot. Now that you know how the card works with the deck and why it's great, let's talk about circumstances where Past in Flames isn't desirable. Typically it's against decks with a lot of graveyard hate, mainly Leyline of the Void. Against these decks I either side out all of my Gifts Ungiven or just leave two, replacing the main engine with Pieces of the Puzzle. The other common occurrence of Gifts Ungiven being a bit weak is when your opponent can't be the target of spells or abilities, typically from Leyline of Sanctity or Witchbane Orb.

Grapeshot β€” My favorite Magic card! It kills all sorts of creatures, mainly the hatebears that the Humans deck plays but Grapeshot's primary purpose is our main win-condition! There's a few cute tricks you can do with Grapeshot such as allowing all of the copies to resolve and then cast either Remand and/or Unsubstantiate on the original spell to return the card to your hand. From there you can recast the Grapeshot. This is effectively having another Grapeshot in your hand for an additional two mana. Having multiple copies of Grapeshot is one of your easiest ways of beating a large amount of graveyard hate!

Past in Flames β€” The sole true "storm-engine" of the deck, what separates the very good Storm pilots vs. the average pilot is knowing when to going off with Past in Flames without an enabler as it's not an easy task. Games that are deterministic are easy, it's the games where you take the highest probability path without knowing if you'll get there are where play-skill and knowledge of the deck really come into play. Past in Flames is a card that requires a lot of practice, not every game will be an easy 3 mana floating game. It's worth noting that the flashback cost is reduced by our enabler creatures for you new storm pilots out there, it's a question that pops up frequently.

Empty the Warrens β€” Not a typical main deck card, but I think you gain a lot of value out of the unexpected. My belief is that by not playing the stock lists, cards like Meddling Mage will be less effective by not knowing to name effects like Empty the Warrens. Rather than something common like Unsubstantiate or Repeal. Empty the Warrens is highly effective in a lot of non-combo match-ups, typically midrange and control decks. Against aggro decks, it's a good road-block to stop the bleeding while you build for an actual kill. There's also a slight benefit of by moving one of my copies of Empty the Warrens to the main deck, I've opened up a sideboard slot.

Perilous Voyage β€” Similar to my views on main deck Empty the Warrens, there's a lot to be said about being unconventional in a world with Meddling Mage paired with Phantasmal Image. Perilous Voyage is an atypical card in a world where most people can see a land drop and know the rest of your deck, so by playing something out of the norm, you gain a huge advantage when your opponent tries to lock you out of the game by cutting off your options with "chanting" creatures. The reason I chose Perilous Voyage over other possible cards is its ability to scry two most of the time, most cards you care about are CMC 2 or less. If the permanent costs more than this, it's beneficial that you're paying less mana than Repeal anyway! I even don't mind casting it just to fix the quality of your draws while slowing the opponent down. Overall, I think Perilous Voyage is a solid card.

Manabase

Spirebluff Canal
Scalding Tarn
Steam Vents

Spirebluff Canal β€” By far the best land in the deck. Zero damage and comes into play untapped 80% of the time. Typically it's the first land I play, but there are occasions with having cantrips and fetchlands, as well as Spirebluff Canal where I'll search for my basic on turn one and then cantrip. Turn two play Spirebluff, and then this leaves the possibility of playing a second copy on your third turn untapped while maximizing your scry.

Scalding Tarn β€” "Why do you play fetchlands?" I hear this question a lot. Let me start off by saying, that the first reason is the same reason throughout Magic as everyone else, deck thinning and an increased percentages of drawing non-land cards in the late game. While these are small percentages they do add up over the course of a longer game, which is very relevant to a combo deck. The "fetchless" lists often have this issue with pockets of lands in long-lasting games. This may seem weird if you've heard the counter argument of actually playing the "fetchless" lists of, "better draws throughout the game due to no shuffling with your scrys" the real issue with this is that's not actually how Magic: the Gathering games go. As a Modern storm player you often cast Gifts Ungiven on an end-step and undo all of the scry-work that you've previously done. There's also the fact that your opponents often shuffle your deck using Path to Exile, Ghost Quarter, Field of Ruin, and Assassin's Trophy. My major concern with these "fetchless" lists is you don't want to get rid of the cards forever, you just don't need them at the moment. Another thing people glance over when looking at lists that play fetchlands relates back to deck thinning is less lands in your deck is a huge benefit for the card Pieces of the Puzzle. You want your deck to be flesh full of instants and sorcerys, not excess lands.

Let's imagine a scenario where you need a second land, you cast Sleight of Hand and see Gifts Ungiven and Shivan Reef. For the rest of the game, you're a combo deck playing down a critical piece of your engine. You want Gifts Ungiven, just not right then. This is part of the reason fetchlands make sense.

There's also the benefit of not being easily locked out of the game by Blood Moon, which is a real issue. Having access to basic lands when you need them is incredibly beneficial. I've heard the counter argument of "Fetchless plays five to six basics" while this is true, they can't always find them when they've locked out of the game on turn two. When playing fetchlands, you have eleven opportunities to "fetchless"'s four to five to have a basic land. If "fetchless" is playing five basic Islands, I imagine there's also games where they struggle to find red sources, which wouldn't be an issue if they played fetchlands.

The last thing I have to point out is that I've heard "fetchless" players claim they take less damage throughout the course of a game. They're playing four copies of Steam vents and four Shivan Reef, this is false. On average they will take more damage/loss of life than the one time cost of using a fetchland.

Polluted Delta, Flooded Strand, Misty Rainforest β€” "Why don't you play Snow-Covered Island?" When you're playing fetchlands, you don't need to play Snow-Covered lands as your deck naturally happens to have plenty of lands with varying names for Gifts Ungiven. The second you play a Snow-Covered Island, your opponent immediately knows that you're on Storm. There's no reason to give that information away, especially considering how little the name-difference is relevant. It's certainly cool to search for two basic Islands with different names, but how often is it relevant? Not very. Instead with this list, if the occasion ever were to present itself, you can just search for the three off-brand fetchlands and that'll do the trick. You may notice that all of these lands search for basic Island and not basic Mountain, that's because having access to Island in the early stages of the game is a lot more critical for cantrip development of your game-plan.

Steam Vents β€” The best non-Spirebluff Canal dual land available that is searchable with your fetchlands and isn't recurring damage like Shivan Reef. There isn't much to be said about the shocklands other than plan ahead in match-ups where the damage is relevant and try to take less damage by searching for them on the end-step.

Island, Mountain β€” Not being locked out of the game by Bloon Moon is always good, basic lands (more so the Island in this scenario) are good to have. Especially in a world with Field of Ruin, Path to Exile, Ghost Quarter, and now Assassin's Trophy. I'm considering a fifth basic land at the moment due to the increased presence of cards that provide you with them. Blue mana is more desirable in the set-up stages of the game which is why you see more copies of Island than Mountain, generally, you really only need red mana on the combo turn or when answering a threat.

Sideboard

Pieces of the Puzzle
Abrade
Lightning Bolt

Pieces of the Puzzle β€” Boarded in for a few reasons. The first and most popular reason is a way to combat graveyard hate as Pieces of the Puzzle allows you to play around graveyard hate efficiently by just ignoring the issue. Chaining cantrips and Pieces of the Puzzle is a lot easier than it looks. The second reason would be to dodge effects like Leyline of Sanctity shutting off your copies of Gifts Ungiven. The last reason would be simply to out-grind midrange and control decks by overwhelming them on cards, which is a very good strategy in these match-ups.

Remand β€” "Why aren't these Negates or Dispels?" I build by decks to be very dynamic and have cards that cross over in a lot of match-ups, I'm a huge proponent of flexibility and those cards are very narrow. I want to be able to side these in against KCI, Tron, Storm, RG Ponza, Control decks and a lot more. There's also the synergies built into your own deck with Grapeshot and Empty the Warrens. The final reason would be that you're a combo deck, the extra draw is actually huge in being able to execute your own game plan. If you want to play traditional counterspells in this slots, you do you, but I don't believe you're getting the most out of your available slots.

Empty the Warrens β€” Another way to beat graveyard hate as well as to "out-grind" midrange and control decks. When I side out all of my enablers and bring in Empty the Warrens, I try to not over-extend if I don't have to. The plan isn't to go all-in but to slowly overwhelm the opponent over time. If each time I cast Empty the Warrens it dealt six-to-eight damage, I would be satisfied. But if they win the game, that's even better! Storm players often forget about Izzet Staticaster and how it works regarding Empty the Warrens. Try not to allow yourself to be blown out by it, but you can also take preventative measures by holding open Abrade and/or Lightning Bolt. This way when they go to target your creature, you kill it in response, and then the rest of your Goblins live to fight another turn.

Abrade β€” Probably the deck's best permanent based answer since the printing of Damping Sphere. It cleanly kills the majority of the ways your opponents are trying to combat you with hate-cards. I can't speak highly enough about Abrade, I wouldn't leave home without the second copy personally.

Lightning Bolt β€” I used to be a lot higher on Lightning Bolt before the printing of Abrade and Damping Sphere. My issue is it doesn't fight back on all of the most popular axes that your opponents are trying to beat you with. At this point, I think it's really only in the deck for Burn and Humans. Within the last six months I've gone from four copies all the way down to two.

Echoing Truth β€” Another card, another name. I say this because of Meddling Mage and our own Gifts Ungiven, but Echoing Truth does provide some other functionality. It's the best card for answering multiple copies of Meddling Mage or Leyline of Sanctity, it's also the cheapest way (tied with Perilous Voyage) the deck has to answer Enchantments.

Wipe Away β€” Wipe Away is in our deck for a few reasons, the first is to be able to answer a Damping Sphere from control decks so that we don't need to worry about it being countered. From there, you can untap and attempt to kill your opponent! The other main reason is that it's actual mana cost is three instead of two. This provides an out to a Chalice of the Void on two, even if those decks aren't very popular.

Popular Cards Not Played

Noxious Revival
Unsubstantiate
Shattering Spree

Repeal β€” A popular main deck option as it answers Meddling Mage as well as a possible main-decked Leyline of Sanctity. The real benefit people see in this card is it's ability to draw a card, that said, I'm not running it because it's a known element in today's digital age. This makes it a liability due to Meddling Mage.

Remand β€” I'm very low on main deck Remand at the moment, the issue is the format has become very "low to the ground" in the sense that decks are going underneath it and making it not as relevant (there's also the issue with Cavern of Souls being very popular at the moment). I believe there's actually very few decks it's good against in the current metagame, which is why I've moved them to the sideboard. I played five Magic Online leagues recently and noticed that I only didn't sideboard it out once, this was a major indicator to me that this card was not where I wanted to be.

Unsubstantiate β€” I've never really been a fan of this card, but I begrudgingly played it when the Humans deck came to power as Remand was awful against them and it provided a third out to Meddling Mage. It suffers from the same thing that Repeal does in that it's a known-element, if you looked at the UR Storm deck from GP: Stockholm you'll notice the list that made top 8 was running a pair of main deck Lightning Bolt, these are the sort of choices that I can get behind.

Noxious Revival β€” I actually like Noxious Revival, but I think the format is in a spot where it's very aggressive and this makes me not want to play this card. Not only do you have to play life, you're missing out on a draw step. Instead, my philosophy has been to just be more threat dense with eight enablers and the full set of Opt β€” which I have been a huge fan of.

Pyroclasm β€” I used to play this as an unknown blow-out card for Humans, I think Anger of the Gods costs too much. A nice benefit of Pyroclasm is that your Baral, Chief of Compliance lives through it! That said, this card can be a bit risky due to Thalia's Lieutenant.

Shattering Spree β€” This card is narrow and we all know how I feel about narrow cards! That said, I've certainly played it in the past. Modern Storm is weak to a resolved Chalice of the Void on two and Shattering Spree is an effective answer for it. Outside of metagames where Eldrazi & Chalice of the Void are popular, I dislike the card and would rather play something with a bit more flexibility.

Pyromancer Ascension β€” I've been playing Modern Storm for a very long time, I have very fond memories of Pyromancer's Ascension β€” but I don't think the card is playable anymore. My issue is you're often sideboarding this card in and people are bringing in their graveyard hate like Leyline of the Void, Rest in Peace, and Nihil Spellbomb. Siding into another graveyard strategy isn't beneficial in my eyes, instead you should do something different. This is why I'm more interested in cards like Pieces of the Puzzle and Empty the Warrens, you should be trying to do something else while your opponent is concentrated on something that is no-longer as effective.

Control

Remand
Pieces of the Puzzle
Unsubstantiate

My approach against control decks is very simple, by not having cards in my deck that turn on their cards, I'm creating virtual card advantage. My overall game-plan is to out card advantage them with Pieces of the Puzzle and Past in Flames, so you can see why the added benefit of not turning on spot removal makes sense. With so many cantrips in the deck, you can really pull ahead on cards that matter. If your opponent has a lot of graveyard hate, that's fine too as you have Empty the Warrens.

Some people like to leave in one of each enabler with Noxious Revival lists, I've tested this and found that it was extremely rare that it was ever relevant. What was more relevant was turning on my opponents creature removal and making Pieces of the Puzzle slightly worse. The argument against my plan is that you can "generate mana" and then have your creature die. This works by you casting your creature, they respond, then you respond with more rituals. This only makes mana on your third ritual, which takes a lot of time to set up and for you to have it and the appropriate color sources. This is a lot of work to generate one additional mana. One thing I've found over the years is people think they need an answer or response to everything when playing storm. When I think having all of these weird plans or "one-ofs" dilutes your deck to the point where you allow other decks to catch-up or gain ground.

Don't expect to kill your opponents quickly in these match-ups post-board because that's not what your goal is. I'm typically content with making land drops and advancing your game-plan, control decks don't apply a whole lot of pressure to your life total so you don't need to be concerned with being fast.

Outside of having a higher number of quality cards in the matchup, you should be aware of Damping Sphere. This is why I bring in cards like Wipe Away, Abrade, and Echoing Truth. Control decks will have one to two copies on average, this is why I usually only bring in three answers. You can also win through it with Empty the Warrens if you've been making land drops.

Remand is great against the control decks as you're often trading your two mana for their four or five. One thing to try to get inexperienced control players with is on turn five using Remand to return Teferi, Hero of Dominaria to it's owners hand. They were expecting to have untapped mana and now you've created a window for yourself to resolve a key spell like Pieces of the Puzzle or even win the game.

Tempo

Empty The Warrens
Grapeshot
Lightning Bolt

The difference between tempo decks and control decks is that these decks often kill you a lot faster than the control decks, that said, the plan varies more here. Against control decks the strategy is very similar for all of them. Here these decks aren't that similar to the plan changes based on how each deck is trying to beat you.

Death's Shadow is a deck that's overloaded on spot removal, so you try to bypass that with Empty the Warrens and siding out a lot of your creatures. You really want to play a creature the turn you attempt to combo, which allows some value of the creatures before they die.

Outside of the Death's Shadow match-up, you're really just looking to combat how the opponent will try to stop you. In general, the best way to beat hate is to avoid it. That's why you'll notice in my lists, I tend to lean heavily on Empty the Warrens. Diverse answers tend to be very good at combating hate, but against these decks I like Lightning Bolt and Abrade as they're multi-purpose.

Midrange

Empty The Warrens
Past In Flames
Pieces of the Puzzle

funnily enough, I think how you sideboard for Midrange decks is a lot closer to control than the tempo decks (and they have blue)! I still like the plan of taking out your creatures and simply getting value out of their own creature removal generating card advantage for you. The way that I approach these matchups is that slow and steady wins the race. My overall game-plan is to out card advantage them with Pieces of the Puzzle and Past in Flames, so you can see why the added benefit of not turning on spot removal makes sense. With so many cantrips in the deck, you can really pull ahead on cards that matter. If your opponent has a lot of graveyard hate, that's fine too as you have Empty the Warrens.

Some people like to leave in one of each enabler with Noxious Revival lists, I've tested this and found that it was extremely rare that it was ever relevant. What was more relevant was turning on my opponents creature removal and making Pieces of the Puzzle slightly worse. The argument against my plan is that you can "generate mana" and then have your creature die. This works by you casting your creature, they respond, then you respond with more rituals. This only makes mana on your third ritual, which takes a lot of time to set up and for you to have it and the appropriate color sources. This is a lot of work to generate one additional mana. One thing I've found over the years is people think they need an answer or response to everything when playing storm. When I think having all of these weird plans or "one-ofs" dilutes your deck to the point where you allow other decks to catch-up or gain ground.

Don't expect to kill your opponents quickly in these match-ups post-board because that's not what your goal is. I'm typically content with making land drops and advancing your game-plan, control decks don't apply a whole lot of pressure to your life total so you don't need to be concerned with being fast.

The Hatebears matchup is a little different, you're really just trying to answer their permanent based hate while swapping Gifts Ungiven for Pieces of the Puzzle. What this accomplishes is that you're less vulnerable against Leonin Arbiter and other search stopping effects like Leyline of Sanctity.

Outside of having a higher number of quality cards in the matchup, you should be aware of Damping Sphere. This is why I bring in cards like Wipe Away, Abrade, and Echoing Truth. Control decks will have one to two copies on average, this is why I usually only bring in three answers. You can also win through it with Empty the Warrens if you've been making land drops.

Aggro

Lightning Bolt
Abrade
Grapeshot

The strategy in these types of match-up is incredibly simple, bring in permanent based hate for whatever they might have and then try to stay as threat dense as possible so that you're not diluting your engine.

To explain this a bit more, Opt is the card that is most frequently sideboarded out against aggro decks. This is because it's not crucial to the overall plan, when you think of what Opt does, it increases card quality at the expense of time. Aggro decks typically do not give you a lot of time.

The type of removal you need to side in varies between the decks, so look below for a closer look at the individual strategies. But to apply a little logic behind the overall thought process, the type of permanent based response depends on how they try to attack you. For example, Lightning Bolt comes in against Spirits and Humans as they primary try to beat you with creatures that interact with your deck. Where a deck like Hollow One tries to beat you with artifacts, enchantments, and an even faster clock so an effect like Lightning Bolt isn't worth while. There's a lot of overlap in these sort of matchups for sure, but try to think of how they're different and plan accordingly.

Combo

Goblin Electromancer
Gifts Ungiven
Remand

I wish I had some real "over-arching" advice for this section, but it's all really based on the matchup.

Miscellaneous

Abrade
Echoing Truth
Wipe Away

I wish I had some real "over-arching" advice for this section, but it's all really based on the matchup.

09-16-2018 Deck List Update - 9/16/18 - Post-SCG:Syracuse on Magic: the Gathering Online

09-15-2018 Jari Rentch vs Branco Neiryack with Jeskai Control at Grand Prix: Stockholm

09-15-2018 Jari Rentsch vs Luis Salvatto with WU Control at Grand Prix: Stockholm

09-15-2018 Martin Muller vs Love Rask with Hardened Scales at Grand Prix: Stockholm

09-15-2018 Paul Muller vs Stefan Mazuroski with Burn at StarcityGames: Syracuse, NY

09-15-2018 Bryant Cook vs Tedd Gibbons with Grixis Control at StarcityGames: Syracuse, NY

09-15-2018 Caleb Scherer vs Jonathan Sukenik with jeskai Control at StarcityGames: Syracuse, NY

08-26-2018 Caleb Sherer vs. Harlan Firer with Jeskai Control at StarcityGames: Baltimore, MD

08-26-2018 Kazu Negri vs. Ross Merriam with Humans at StarcityGames: Baltimore, MD

07-28-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Gustav Linner with Living End StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

07-28-2018 Paul Muller vs. Abraham Stein with B/R Hollow One StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

07-28-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Matthew Brown with Sultai Death's Shadow StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

07-01-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Ross Merriam with Blue Moon at StarCityGames: Atlanta, GA

06-30-2018 Mitchell Stephenson vs. Aaron Barich with Infect at StarCityGames: Atlanta, GA

06-30-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Chi Hoi Yim with Bant Company at StarCityGames: Atlanta, GA

06-30-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Jim Davis with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Atlanta, GA

06-17-2018 Modern League - Bryant Cook - 06/17/18 on Magic: the Gathering Online

06-09-2018 Emma Handy vs. Aaron Barich with Infect at StarCityGames: Invitational, VA

06-09-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Dan Schriever with G/W Midrange at StarCityGames: Invitational, VA

06-02-2018 Bryant Cook vs. Garrett Allen with Affinity at StarCityGames: Regionals | Syracuse, NY

06-02-2018 Bryant Cook vs. William Moody with Affinity at StarCityGames: Regionals | Syracuse, NY

05-31-2018 U/R Storm With Jeff Hoogland on Magic: the Gathering Online

05-31-2018 U/R Storm With Jeff Hoogland on Magic: the Gathering Online

05-26-2018 Daniel Seidl vs. Todd Stevens with G/W Company at StarCityGames: Minneapolis, MN

05-26-2018 Daniel Seidl vs. Todd Stevens with G/W Company at StarCityGames: Minneapolis, MN

05-19-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Andrew Parsons with Living End at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

05-19-2018 Christoffer Andersen vs. Pieter Tubergen with Affinity at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

05-19-2018 Paul Muller vs. Sean Mogelgaard with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

04-28-2018 Paul Muller vs. Todd Anderson with Humans at StarCityGames: Atlanta, GA

04-14-2018 Paul Muller vs. Reid Duke with Jund at Grand Prix: Hartford, CT

04-08-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Paul Kowalski with Affinity at StarCityGames: Milwaukee, WI

02-18-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Brennan Decandio with Grixis Death's Shadow at StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

02-18-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Stephen Dykman with Death and Taxes at StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

01-27-2018 Paul Muller vs. Benjamin Nikolich with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Philadelphia, PA

01-20-2018 Ryan Kirk vs. Harlan Firer with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Dallax, TX

01-06-2018 Zachary Kiihne vs. Yoel Izsak with Burn at StarCityGames: Balitmore, MD

01-06-2018 Zachary Kiihne vs. Dylan Donegan with Grixis Shadow at StarCityGames: Balitmore, MD

01-06-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Steven Ashley with Burn at StarCityGames: Columbus, OH

01-06-2018 Caleb Scherer vs. Kevin Jones with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Columbus, OH

12-08-2017 Eli Kassis vs. Brendan Reginbald with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Invitational, VA

10-22-2017 Cooper Johnson vs. Kyle Boggemes with Counters Company at StarCityGames: Cincinnati, OH

10-22-2017 Cooper Johnson vs. Andrew Elenbogen with Affinity at StarCityGames: Cincinnati, OH

10-22-2017 Scott Simmons vs. Collins Mullen with Affinity at StarCityGames: Cincinnati, OH

10-21-2017 Cooper Johnson vs. Collins Mullen with Humans at StarCityGames: Cincinnati, OH

10-14-2017 Anthony Epps vs. Andrew Jessup with Grixis Death's Shadow at StarCityGames: Charlotte, NC

10-14-2017 Paul Muller vs. Joshua Smith with Affinity at StarCityGames: Charlotte, NC

10-14-2017 Mikael Conrow vs. Timothy Harris with Elves at StarCityGames: Charlotte, NC

09-16-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Brandon Dollaway with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

09-16-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Owen Podwika with Living End at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

09-16-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Scott Hunt with Ad Nauseam at StarCityGames: Louisville, KY

08-16-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Zachary Alexander with Affinity at StarCityGames: Richmond, VA

08-16-2017 Emma Handy vs. Patrick Reynolds with JeskaiControl at StarCityGames: Richmond, VA

08-16-2017 Kazu Negri vs. Jonathan Rosum with Jeskai Control at StarCityGames: Richmond, VA

08-16-2017 Kazu Negri vs. James Foerst with Grixis Death's Shadow at StarCityGames: Richmond, VA

08-10-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Chase Bahne with Scapeshift at StarCityGames: Syracuse, NY

08-10-2017 Oliver Tomakjo vs. Roman Fedkowskyj with Living End at StarCityGames: Syracuse, NY

08-10-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Daniel Jessup with Grixis Death's Shadow at StarCityGames: Syracuse, NY

08-10-2017 Jeffery Pyka vs. Jim Davis with Tron at StarCityGames: Syracuse, NY

08-10-2017 Ryan Dunn vs. Caleb Scherer with Storm at StarCityGames: Syracuse, NY

06-10-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Devon Teague with Abzan at StarCityGames: Charlotte, NC

06-10-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Andrew Jessup with Grixis Death's Shadow at StarCityGames: Charlotte, NC

06-01-2017 James Ollerhead vs. Ried Duke with Jund at StarCityGames: Balitmore, MD

03-03-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Aaron Fernandez with Affinity at StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

03-03-2017 Caleb Scherer Deck Tech at StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN

03-03-2017 Caleb Scherer vs. Aaron Fernandez with Affinity at StarCityGames: Indianapolis, IN